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SCIENTIA SINICA Informationis, Volume 49 , Issue 7 : 911-931(2019) https://doi.org/10.1360/N112018-00112

Electromagnetic spectrum umbrella

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  • ReceivedMay 3, 2018
  • AcceptedNov 13, 2018
  • PublishedJul 16, 2019

Abstract


Funded by

国家自然科学基金(61531009,61471108,61771107)

国家科技重大专项(2016ZX03001009)

中央高校基本科研业务费专项资金


References

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  • Figure 3

    Three-dimensional structure of electromagnetic spectrum umbrella

  • Figure 4

    (Color online) An application case of electromagnetic spectrum umbrella

  • Figure 5

    System model of electromagnetic spectrum umbrella

  • Figure 6

    Node model of electromagnetic spectrum umbrella

  • Figure 7

    A signal processing flow of electromagnetic spectrum umbrella node

  • Figure 8

    Wireless interconnect architecture of electromagnetic spectrum umbrella node for radiated interference waveform. (a) Centralized architecture; (b) self-organizing structure

  • Figure 9

    (Color online) Relationship between the sensitivity loss probability of authorized and unauthorized user receivers and the number of interference nodes. The probability and statistical threshold is $\Omega~_S~=~46.8$ dB and $\Omega~_A~=~9.3$ dB

  • Figure 10

    (Color online) Relationship between the average loss of sensitivity and the number of interference nodes in authorized and unauthorized user receivers

  • Figure 11

    (Color online) Relationship between the RMS of sensitivity loss and the number of interference nodes in authorized and unauthorized user receivers

  • Figure 12

    (Color online) Relationship between interference effectiveness of electromagnetic spectrum umbrella $\eta~$ and number of interference nodes. The probability and statistical threshold is $\Omega~_S~=~41.8$ dB and $\Omega~_A~=~14.3$ dB

  • Figure 13

    (Color online) Schematic diagram of the experiment scene of electromagnetic spectrum umbrella

  • Figure 14

    (Color online) The spectrum of the authorized receiver signal before and after umbrella interference suppression, excluding the communication signal

  • Figure 15

    (Color online) The spectrum of the authorized receiver signal before and after umbrella interference suppression, including the communication signal

  • Figure 16

    (Color online) The relationship between the speech signal distortion and the communication transmit power. Umbrella self-interference emission power is 15 dBm

  • Figure 17

    (Color online) The relationship between the speech signal distortion and the umbrella self-interference transmit power. The communication transmit power is 15 dBm

  • Table 1   Experimental equipment parameters
    Parameters Communication transmitter Interfering transmitter Authorized receiver
    Signal sent or received FM signal M sequence SPSP signal Composition
    Carrier frequency (MHz) 100 100 100
    Working bandwidth (kHz) 25 25 25
    Transmitting power (dBm) 15 15
    Transmitter SNR (dB) 50 50
    Receiver background noise (dBm) $-$80 $-$80
  • Table 2   Relation between self-interference suppression system and self-interference emission power of the umbrella
    Umbrella self-interfering transmitting power (dBm) 15 12 9 6 3 0
    Umbrella self-interference suppression ratio (dB) 28.5 28.5 28.6 28.5 28.5 28.8
  • Table 3   The relationship between speech signal quality and the transmitting power of desired signal. The self-interference emission power of the umbrella is 15 dBm.
    Communication signal transmission power (dBm) 15 12 9 6 3 0
    Without umbrella self-interfering signal Excellent Excellent Excellent Excellent Excellent Excellent
    With umbrella self-interfering signal Excellent Excellent Excellent Excellent Excellent Excellent
  • Table 4   The relationship between sound signal quality and self-interference transmit power of the umbrella. The communication transmit power is 15 dBm.
    Self-interfering transmitting power (dBm) 15 12 9 6 3 0
    Speech signal quality Excellent Excellent Excellent Excellent Excellent Excellent