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SCIENTIA SINICA Informationis, Volume 48 , Issue 6 : 605-625(2018) https://doi.org/10.1360/N112018-00106

Review of ultra-thin and skin-like solid electronics

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  • ReceivedApr 27, 2018
  • AcceptedMay 7, 2018
  • PublishedJun 13, 2018

Abstract


References

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  • Figure 1

    (Color online) Flexible electronics and their applications on human body

  • Figure 2

    (Color online) The functions of skin-like solid electronics

  • Figure 3

    (Color online) The skin-like temeprature sensor's illustration [40]@Copyright 2015 Macmillan Publishers Ltd.

  • Figure 4

    (Color online) The scanning electron microscope image of the semi-permeable film. (a) The side view; (b) the surfacial micro-porous structure; (c) the micro-porous structure in the side view [40]@Copyright 2015 Macmillan Publishers Ltd.

  • Figure 5

    (Color online) The long-term wearing test. (a) is wearing the device, and the inset is the device picture;protect łinebreak (b) is the skin after removing the device, and the inset is the functional layer of the removed device [40]@Copyright 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited

  • Figure 6

    (Color online) The temperature device for core body temperature measurement. (a) The explosive view of the device; (b) the device photo; (c) wearing the device on the forehead [41]@Copyright 2016 John Wiley and Sons

  • Figure 7

    (Color online) The core body temperature sensor based on porous isolator. (a) Photo of the device; (b) scanning electron microscope image of the device; (c) the device being bent [41]@Copyright 2016 John Wiley and Sons

  • Figure 8

    (Color online) The blood flow meter. (a) The illustration of the device structure; (b) the photo of device wear-protect łinebreak ing [42]@Copyright 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science

  • Figure 9

    (Color online) The surfacial temperature field under the influence of the blood flow. (a) The measured temperature distribution; (b) the temperature distribution after removing the ceter heating [42]@Copyright 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science

  • Figure 10

    (Color online) Skin-like strain sensor's illustration and wearing photos [48]@Copyright 2016 IEEE

  • Figure 11

    (Color online) The pulse signal monitored by the skin-like strain sensor [48]@Copyright 2016 IEEE

  • Figure 12

    (Color online) The micro-structured dielectric layer of the pressure sensor [50,51]@Copyright 2015 Materials Research Society, 2014 John Wiley and Sons

  • Figure 13

    (Color online) The pressure sensor with multi-level micro-structure (a), and its response to pressure (b) [52]@Copyright 2014 John Wiley and Sons

  • Figure 14

    (Color online) The pressure sensor with micro-structure and its application in measuring the pulse [53]@Copyright 2015 John Wiley and Sons

  • Figure 15

    (Color online) The illustration of electrochemical twin channels measuring prinple. The photo of the skin-like flexible glucose biosensor (a) attached to the skin (b) [63]@Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science

  • Figure 16

    (Color online) Results of the clinical trials conduceted with skin-like blood glucose monitoring system and the finger-pricking glucometer [63]@Copyright 2017 American Association for the Advancement of Science

  • Figure 17

    (Color online) The illustration of blood oxygen measuring principle [64]@Copyright 2017 John Wiley and Sons

  • Figure 18

    (Color online) The structure of the skin-like blood oxygen sensor. (a) The 3D illstration and (b) the cross section [64]@Copyright 2017 John Wiley and Sons

  • Figure 19

    (Color online) The signal obtained by the skin-like blood oxygen sensor [64]@Copyright 2017 John Wiley and Sons

  • Figure 20

    (Color online) The structure of the ultra-flexible energy harvester. (a) Explosive view; (b) cross section view; (c) illustration of a single nano-ribbon; (d) the array of the nano-ribbons and their gold interconnects (zoom in)