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SCIENCE CHINA Materials, Volume 62 , Issue 9 : 1350-1356(2019) https://doi.org/10.1007/s40843-019-9432-y

Highly conductive and transparent metal-organic frameworks thin film

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  • ReceivedMar 4, 2019
  • AcceptedApr 18, 2019
  • PublishedMay 7, 2019

Abstract


Funded by

the Major R&D Plan of Zhejiang Natural Science Foundation(LD18E020001)

the National Key Research and Development Program(2016YFA0200204)

the Key Program of National Natural Science and Foundation(51632008)

the National Natural Science Foundations of China(21671171,21875212)

and the National Basic Research Program of China 973 Program(2015CB655302)


Acknowledgment

This work was supported by the Major R&D Plan of Zhejiang Natural Science Foundation (LD18E020001), the National Key Research and Development Program (2016YFA0200204), the Key Program of National Natural Science Foundation (51632008), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21671171 and 21875212), and the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, 2015CB655302).


Interest statement

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.


Contributions statement

Peng X supervised the project. Li Z designed and performed the experiments, analyzed the results and wrote the manuscript. Guo Y, Wang X, Ma X and Zhao X assisted in the device fabrication and measurement. Deng Z, Ying W and Chen D contributed to the data analysis. All authors contributed to the general discussion.


Author information

Zhuoyi Li received his bachelor degree (2017) in the School of Metallurgy and Environment at Central South University. He is currently pursuing his PhD degree in the School of Materials Science and Engineering at Zhejiang University under the supervision of Prof. Xinsheng Peng. His present research interests mainly focus on the design and synthesis of electrically conductive metal-organic frameworks (MOF) membranes for energy conversion devices.


Xinsheng Peng received his PhD in 2003 at the Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. He became a full professor at the School of Materials Science and Engineering at Zhejiang University in 2010. His research interests mainly focus on the design and synthesis of functional membranes and controlled mass transportation in energy and environmental science.


Supplement

Supplementary information

Experimental details and supporting data are available in the online version of the paper.


References

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  • Figure 1

    Surface SEM images of PEDOT:PSS/ZHNs (a), ZIF-8 thin film (b), the PPZ-20 thin film (c), the PPZ-20 thin film after DMSO modification (d).

  • Scheme 1

    Illustration of the preparation process of PEDOT:PSS@ZIF-8 thin film.

  • Figure 2

    (a) XRD patterns of ZIF-8 and the PPZ thin films. (b) FTIR of ZIF-8, PEDOT:PSS and the PPZ thin films. (c) XPS of ZIF-8 and the PPZ thin films. (d) BET surface areas and micropore volumes of ZIF-8 and the PPZ thin films.

  • Figure 3

    (a) Conductivity of the PPZ thin films (with 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 wt% PEDOT:PSS, respectively). (b) Conductivity of the PPZ thin films before and after DMSO modification. (c) Light transmittance of ZIF-8 and the PPZ thin films before (lines without symbols) and after (lines with symbols) DMSO modification. (d) Circuit diagram of a closed loop. (e, f) Photographs of the PPZ thin film (with and without modification) in a closed loop with a power supply (6 V) lighting a red LED device.

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